November 17, 2017

November 7, 2017

July 31, 2017

July 12, 2017

July 10, 2017

Please reload

Recent Posts

I'm busy working on my blog posts. Watch this space!

Please reload

Featured Posts

I hope it's not serious!

November 7, 2017

 

 

Nothing is worse than finding a surprise waiting under your pets furry coat. Finding new lumps and bumps can be worry some, but just how serious is it?

 

Tumor? That is the question majority of pet owners have when new spots are found. Your veterinarian may be able to make an educated guess with just an exam, but without taking a biopsy and sending them to a pathologist for identification, a definitive diagnosis is simply not possible. So nothing can be 100% determined with a physical exam.

 

Lipomas are a commonly encountered lump. These soft, rounded, non-painful masses that are usually  just under the skin are generally benign. Begin means it does not invade to surrounding tissues, mostly generalized to one area. Most veterinarians take a conservative approach to masses like lipomas and sebaceous cysts. Only recommend removal if they are growing rapidly or causing problems for the dog. Every lump or bump that is not removed should be monitored CLOSELY.

 

Metastasize is the occurrence or invasion of pathogens away from the point of origin. These types of tumors can be considered dangerous. 


Lymphoma- is a blood borne cancer of a type of white blood cell called a lymphocyte. Most common presentation showing enlargement of external lymph nodes. 

Mast cells- or mastocytomas, are immune cells normally involved in allergic reactions. These cells are found throughout the body; therefore, tumors can develop in any organ system.

Osteosarcoma-is the most common primary bone cancer in dogs. Tumors tend to occur in the limbs of large and giant breed dogs. Osteosarcoma tumors can spread from the bone to distant sites in the body, including the lungs, lymph nodes, and other bones. 

Melanoma- the most common oral cancer seen in dogs. Breeds with darker pigmented gums and tongues are at a higher risk

Mammary Gland Carcinoma- Unspayed female dogs are at risk for developing mammary tumors due to hormonal influence on the mammary tissue. Half of the tumors dogs develop in their mammary glands are cancerous and half are benign.

Hemangisarcoma- is cancer that arises from the cells that line blood vessels. The most common anatomical locations where this cancer arises includes the spleen, the skin, and the right atrium of the heart.

 

Take good surface inventory of your dog today, and at least once a month from here on out. Be sure to remember or record any new growths or present ones that are growing faster than normal. Early detection may possibly mean longer life. 

 

 

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Follow Us
Please reload

Search By Tags
Please reload

Archive
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon

© 2023 by The Animal Clinic. Proudly created with Wix.com

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now